Book notes: Extreme Ownership

Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin book summary.

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Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win by Jocko Willink, Leif Babin

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Synopsis: “In Extreme Ownership, Jocko Willink and Leif Babin share hard-hitting Navy SEAL combat stories that translate into lessons for business and life. With riveting firsthand accounts of making high-pressure decisions as Navy SEAL battlefield leaders, this audiobook is equally gripping for leaders who seek to dominate other arenas.

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Book notes: I Can’t Make This Up

I Can’t Make This Up by Kevin Hart book summary.

I Can’t Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin Hart

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Synopsis: “Superstar comedian and Hollywood box-office star Kevin Hart turns his immense talent to the written word by writing some words. Put them together and you have the funniest, most heartfelt, and most inspirational memoir on survival, success, and the importance of believing in yourself since Old Yeller.

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The most “Profound” piece of advice

Profound – Daily writing prompt

One of the best pieces of advice I’ve received drastically changed the way I looked at life.

A few years ago, I had just graduated college and didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life. I was thousands of dollars in debt, I was living on my parents’ couch after moving back home, and I didn’t know where my life was headed.

I thought I had wanted to work for the government and that the best way to do so would be to serve in the armed forces.

Long story short, that didn’t work out, haha.

Fortunately, I soon met up with a college friend who introduced me to the world of entrepreneurship. Several more meetings within the course of a year, I had met a bunch of very high-level, successful entrepreneurs who kept giving the same advice:

Always keep learning and growing.

There’s a quote by Ray Croc that goes, “If you’re green you’re growing, if you’re ripe you’re rotting”

Jack Canfield mentions in The Success Principles the idea of C.A.N.I. = Constant and Never-ending Improvement.

In Japanese, this idea of constant improvement is called kaizen.

I learned from one of my mentors that the key to obtaining your goals is to grow and expand your comfort zone.

Instead of shrinking our goals to match our reality, we gave to grow ourselves to encompass everything we want to achieve.

It was empowering to learn that I had the potential to achieve anything, as long as commit long term to grow myself on a daily basis and constantly pushing the boundaries of my comfort zone.

I work out 5-6 times a week to keep expanding my physical comfort zone. I read almost 1 book a week to expand my knowledge. I attend church weekly in order to expand my spiritual knowledge. I am constantly setting goals and deadlines on when to achieve them to see if I’m on track. I visit my long term goals everyday so I’m always in tuned with my life vision.

Today, I can honestly say I’m happy because I always feel like I’m growing. I’m also pumped to know I’m making steady progress instead of being stuck or feeling stagnant.

Whats your most profound piece of advice? I’d love to hear about it in the comments! I respond to all comments so feel free 🙂

“Unpredictable”

Unpredictable – daily post writing prompt

Adj. – not able to be predicted or foreseen

My mind instantly goes to the concept of “the path less traveled.” Here are some thoughts:

-There is no traffic on the extra mile

-To stand out, zig when everyone else is zagging

  • this reminds me of a quote by Warren Buffet, I believe, “be greedy when others are fearful, and be fearful when others are greedy

-the path less traveled is likely to be scarier since few have gone that way, but you can really leave a mark a pioneer. Sure there are more risks, but also more excitement

  • they say there’s a thin line between fear and excitement
  • theres also a thin line between “creepy” and “romantic,” just depends on if you think like them back (sorry, random tangent)

-sometimes it can be more fulfilling to walk your own path than follow in someone else’s footsteps

-a mentor of mine once said, “people can’t follow in your footsteps of you don’t pick up your feet and move”

  • reminds me of parents who made excuses their whole lives and never accomplished anything, but then force their kids to do things they don’t want to do because the parents are trying to live through their kids. But how can your kids achieve when their parents, who should be their role models, have never picked up their feet and moved? Or else they’re destined to follow in your (lack of) footsteps.

-it takes more strength and endurance to walk the path less traveled. Those who don’t opt for the easy, more traveled path will find themselves stronger because they took the hard road.

 

Small problems, small person

The size of the problem determines the size of the person.

So this morning as I was headed to the gym for my 5:30am workout, I somehow managed to lose my earbuds during the walk from my car to the gym (as I was taking a selfie for my workout accountability group). I spent the next 5-10 minutes retracing my steps, getting frustrated at the fact that I may have just lost my $20 apple ear buds.

gym selfie
Somewhere between the walk from my car to this selfie is when I lost them =(

A couple weeks prior, I had to replace my $10 gym lock that I absentmindedly left in the men’s locker room. Needless to say, I was ticked that I can’t seem to stop wasting money on things I lose.

After giving up the search, I realized that I was getting worked up over something so small. Yes, $20 can buy a lot of things like a all-you-can-eat Korean BBQ or 2 admission tickets to a new release movie in theaters. And I’m not a rich person, but I’m also not so financially insecure where replacing lost earphones would mean I couldn’t eat for the next few days.

My point: why was I letting something so trivial get me down?

In the book “Secrets of the Millionaire Mind,” T. Harv Eker makes a comparison about the mentalities “rich” people versus “poor” people. He says that poor people are smaller than their problems, whereas rich people are bigger than their problems.

This is how I interpret it: if I let something small get me down, then I’m a small person. Small problems don’t affect big people, only big problems.

As one part of my daily habits, I recite what’s called a “commercial affirmation” to myself. Its pretty self-explanatory, but it’s basically a paragraph of affirmations written in the third person about the person I want to become in the future. Or as a mentor of mine says, my “higher self.” I do this once a day, usually in the mornings before my commute to work.

When something small like losing my earphones gets me worked up, I think: would my higher self, the multi-millionaire entrepreneur, international speaker, and bestselling author be phased by this?

The answer is always a resounding “Nope.”

If the size of the problems determines the size of the person, how “big” of a person are you? What’s getting you down that you know isn’t worth your time, energy, or attention?

I’ve always been taught that mindset is where it all begins. When you can control how you think, you can control your reality.

Event + Response = Outcome.

But that’s a whole topic in itself, haha. As of now, I have a new lock, 2 sets of earphones (a backup in case I lose mine again), and I haven’t even given it a second thought.

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Daiso earbuds = $1.50. Problem solved. B)