People Who Get Offended Easily

“Those who get offended easily should be offended more often”

Counter-cultural idea: Nobody can offend you, it’s your choice to be offended. When we get offended easily, it’s a sign that we’re either taking something personally or taking things too seriously.

I have to remind myself that when someone says something “offensive” to me or about me, it reveals more about them and their faults rather than myself.

A perfect example: check out the comments section on my original Facebook post. Someone who saw my video got offended by what I was saying and took it down a different rabbit hole.

He interpreted it as being complacent when there is an injustice happening (such as bigotry, racism, etc). This was definitely NOT the spirit or intention of the video.

In my observation, he was noticeably annoyed by the idea and was probably looking to start a fight and demonstrate his intellectual prowess and moral high ground. He also tagged his friend for backup, which seemed to be intended to try and “win” this argument.

While it would have been easy for me to take it personally and attack back, I rewatched my video and took my own advice. I understood where he was coming from, and even though he diverged from the spirit of the idea, I knew this wasn’t a battle I needed to try and “win”.

Instead, I chose to end the discussion with acceptanceempathy, and gratitude for him and his beliefs.

To be completely honest, when I first started reading the thread and the attacks, my heart rate increased as an involuntary “fight or flight” reaction took place in my mind/body. However, I took a second to listen, understand, and calmly formulate my best response.

And in retrospect, I thought it was ironic and hilarious that someone got offended by my video about not getting offended and how you control your own emotional response to things.

We should learn from those who can laugh at themselves easily and not take things personally. These people are almost always much happier.

Even for me, this is a work in progress. And this was such a beautifully-timed challenge for me to face and apply my own advice.

Let me know your thoughts! Do you agree? Disagree?

Originally posted on 7/26/18 on Facebook here.

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Book notes: Dreams from My Father by Barack Obama

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance by Barack Obama book summary.

Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance by Barack Obama

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Synopsis: “In this lyrical, unsentimental, and compelling memoir, the son of a black African father and a white American mother searches for a workable meaning to his life as a black American. It begins in New York, where Barack Obama learns that his father, a figure he knows more as a myth than as a man, has been killed in a car accident. This sudden death inspires an emotional odyssey; first to a small town in Kansas, from which he retraces the migration of his mother’s family to Hawaii, and then to Kenya, where he meets the African side of his family, confronts the bitter truth of his father’s life, and at last reconciles his divided inheritance.” -Audible

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A Year in Review: 2017

My 2017 reflection. Blessings, achievements, goals, and themes/lessons of the year.

Why Am I Writing This?

It’s that time of year again. I actually really enjoy doing these retrospectives. I’ve been preparing for this post all year since writing my 2016 review post the same time last year. Since then, I’ve been taking notes on the lessons I’ve learned along the way in order to revisit these insights at the end of the year.

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Book notes: Principles by Ray Dalio

Principles: Life and Work by Ray Dalio book summary.

Principles: Life and Work by Ray Dalio

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Synopsis: “Ray Dalio, one of the world’s most successful investors and entrepreneurs, shares the unconventional principles that he’s developed, refined, and used over the past 40 years to create unique results in both life and business – and which any person or organization can adopt to help achieve their goals.

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Book notes: The Art of Exceptional Living by Jim Rohn

The Art of Exceptional Living by Jim Rohn summary.

The Art of Exceptional Living by Jim Rohn

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Synopsis: “The Art of Exceptional Living by Jim Rohn is the can’t-miss guide that shows you how to begin living life according to your own rules. Catch up on your success and attain all you want and need. Let success expert Jim Rohn teach you how to master the art of living exceptionally well!

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Book notes: Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink & Leif Babin

Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink and Leif Babin book summary.

Extreme Ownership: How U.S. Navy SEALs Lead and Win by Jocko Willink, Leif Babin

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Synopsis: “In Extreme Ownership, Jocko Willink and Leif Babin share hard-hitting Navy SEAL combat stories that translate into lessons for business and life. With riveting firsthand accounts of making high-pressure decisions as Navy SEAL battlefield leaders, this audiobook is equally gripping for leaders who seek to dominate other arenas.

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Book notes: I Can’t Make This Up by Kevin Hart

I Can’t Make This Up by Kevin Hart book summary.

I Can’t Make This Up: Life Lessons by Kevin Hart

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Synopsis: “Superstar comedian and Hollywood box-office star Kevin Hart turns his immense talent to the written word by writing some words. Put them together and you have the funniest, most heartfelt, and most inspirational memoir on survival, success, and the importance of believing in yourself since Old Yeller.

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Book notes: Born a Crime by Trevor Noah

Born a Crime Trevor Noah book summary by Marlo Yonocruz

Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah


Synopsis: Trevor Noah, one of the comedy world’s fastest-rising stars and host of The Daily Show, tells his wild coming-of-age story during the twilight of apartheid in South Africa and the tumultuous days of freedom that followed. In this Audible Studios production, Noah provides something deeper than traditional memoirists: powerfully funny observations about how farcical political and social systems play out in our lives.

The stories Noah tells are by turns hilarious, bizarre, tender, dark, and poignant – subsisting on caterpillars during months of extreme poverty, making comically pitiful attempts at teenage romance in a color-obsessed world, thrown into jail as the hapless fall guy for a crime he didn’t commit, thrown by his mother from a speeding car driven by murderous gangsters, and more.” -Amazon

Opening Thoughts:

All I know about Trevor Noah was that he took over as host for The Daily Show on Comedy Central after John Stewart left, that he’s hilarious, and he’s South African. Other than that, I knew nothing about Trevor. I saw the ratings and reviews and was instantly sold. I’ve been looking for a good autobiography to pick up, but thought this would be a separation from the typical books I read about business moguls, high performers, and wealthy people. The last book I read about a comedian was Steve Martin’s book, which was a good time as well.

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