When people say “I don’t have time”

What “having no time” really means.

I was listening to a podcast from the GaryVee Audio Experience featuring Tony Robbins and he said something that really got me thinking.

“If you don’t have 10 minutes, you don’t have a life” -Tony Robbins

I had so many thoughts running through my head that I decided to just shoot a video while still in my car instead of writing out a blog post. Gary Vaynerchuk always says to document and speak your truth. It doesn’t have to be pretty, but what’s important is that you do it. So I did it.

Idea: If we really don’t have 10 minutes to stop and relax, or 10 minutes to connect with someone like, then what kind of life are we truly living? What are the values we’re cultivating in our own lives?

Let me know your thoughts! Do you agree? Disagree? I love healthy discussions 😊

 

 

Originally posted on July 22nd, 2018 on Facebook.

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The most “Profound” piece of advice

Profound – Daily writing prompt

One of the best pieces of advice I’ve received drastically changed the way I looked at life.

A few years ago, I had just graduated college and didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life. I was thousands of dollars in debt, I was living on my parents’ couch after moving back home, and I didn’t know where my life was headed.

I thought I had wanted to work for the government and that the best way to do so would be to serve in the armed forces.

Long story short, that didn’t work out, haha.

Fortunately, I soon met up with a college friend who introduced me to the world of entrepreneurship. Several more meetings within the course of a year, I had met a bunch of very high-level, successful entrepreneurs who kept giving the same advice:

Always keep learning and growing.

There’s a quote by Ray Croc that goes, “If you’re green you’re growing, if you’re ripe you’re rotting”

Jack Canfield mentions in The Success Principles the idea of C.A.N.I. = Constant and Never-ending Improvement.

In Japanese, this idea of constant improvement is called kaizen.

I learned from one of my mentors that the key to obtaining your goals is to grow and expand your comfort zone.

Instead of shrinking our goals to match our reality, we gave to grow ourselves to encompass everything we want to achieve.

It was empowering to learn that I had the potential to achieve anything, as long as commit long term to grow myself on a daily basis and constantly pushing the boundaries of my comfort zone.

I work out 5-6 times a week to keep expanding my physical comfort zone. I read almost 1 book a week to expand my knowledge. I attend church weekly in order to expand my spiritual knowledge. I am constantly setting goals and deadlines on when to achieve them to see if I’m on track. I visit my long term goals everyday so I’m always in tuned with my life vision.

Today, I can honestly say I’m happy because I always feel like I’m growing. I’m also pumped to know I’m making steady progress instead of being stuck or feeling stagnant.

Whats your most profound piece of advice? I’d love to hear about it in the comments! I respond to all comments so feel free 🙂

3 Ways to Live a “Dramatic” Life

Dramatic – Daily writing prompt

Monday mornings at work, we have a meeting usually about an hour long. The first half of the meeting we usually tell fun stories about our weekend on a volunteer basis. It’s a fun little exercise to get the week started as some stories can be pretty entertaining.

Over the past year, I’ve developed a bit of a reputation of having funny or at least mildly interesting stories. It’s now at the point where people occasionally request a story from me because they know I’ll have something interesting to say!

Honestly, I don’t believe my life is anymore interesting than the next person. However, I can tell you for a fact that I do go into the weekend with a mindset of having a fun experience or finding an interesting story to share with the group on Monday.

Here are some tips I have to living a more exciting life:

1. Seek out new experiences

Sometimes my girlfriend and I will look on Groupon or any other website for discounted deals on local activities. This is how we found ourselves taking archery classes, or how I went Flyboarding in Miami. One time, we just rented bikes to go cruising near the ocean at Huntington Beach for an afternoon. Another time we took yoga classes for two months for $30 each. We try to find new things to do at least once or twice a month. With sites like groupon, there’s usually a large number of activities to choose from.

2. Be proactive with your weekends

Instead of going into the weekend thinking, “I’m just going to relax. I’m too tired to do anything,” look to the weekend as a time to have fun and something to look forward to. Don’t be reactive and wait for something to happen to you. Before you know it, you’ll be sitting on your couch watching Netflix again, binge watching some series for 20 hours straight and wonder where the weekend went. If you want your life experience to consist of hours of Netflix, then go for it. But I would hardly consider that a great experience to look back on.

3. Say “Yes” more often

I found some of the most fun things I’ve done were usually things I didn’t want to do at first. But once I got out of my own mental comfort zone, the experience turned out to be more fun. For example, I was never big on outdoor activities like hiking. Now, however, my girlfriend and I have been on several trails because she’s always push for going. Overall, it’s a fun activity and great exercise as well. The views can be worth it alone, and being away from technology is a great feeling.

Any other tips for living a more fun and interesting life? Please let me know in the comments!

What to do in a “Crisis”

Crisis – daily writing prompt

So imagine everything in your world is falling apart (or maybe for some of us, this is a sad reality 😢).

Let’s say a crisis could be losing your job, an unexpected breakup, or a mega-earthquake like in the movie San Andreas with Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson (I loved that movie btw. Ratings weren’t amazing but who cares, the Rock is a #boss)

I asked my coworker for some nuggets of wisdom in these scenarios, and here’s what he would advise:

-Try not to handle everything at once, take it one step at a time.

-Handle the issues in a queue, you’ll stress out if you try to do it all at once.

-Think objectively, focus on the goal rather than the means. Easier said than done since these problems are subjective, but stepping back can help provide some clarity.

-Focus on the things that make you happy. Be around friends and reconnect with people.

-Redirect your energy and use your time constructively. Find new hobbies, stay active, keep your mind occupied. In a crisis, the worst place to be is alone with your thoughts.

Any other good pieces of advice for people dealing with a crisis? Let us know in the comments! 🙂

Piece of Advice: “Attitude of Gratitude”

A Piece of Advice – Discovery Challenge

“This week’s challenge brings out the positive: tell us about a piece of advice you’ve received — and would like to share with others.”

One story immediately comes to mind:

A friend of mine, let’s call him John, told me how the CEO (aka Bossman) of his company rules with an iron fist. He’s the guy who puts the fear of God into people when they mess up. He’s pretty ruthless with calling out your shortcomings when you produce low quality work.

His boss once told him that the best place to be is not in his office. Meaning if someone is called into his office and his door is closed, it’s almost guaranteed that he’s tearing them a new one.

You would think people would dread coming to everyday. He says his workplace has a high turnover rate.

On the contrary, however, many of the people who don’t quit or get fired immediately love coming to work. The environment is fun, everyone has a good attitude, people are constantly challenge with their workload and forced to grow. Aside from the occasional meetings the Bossman will have with teams that aren’t performing, there’s a general consensus that his management style is an effective way to keep people on their toes and productive.

One time, John finds himself in the Bossman’s office. He recently got promoted into a new position and was having difficulty keeping up with the workload. He made a few minor mistakes, which was understandable considering he’s never done this type of work before.

He goes into Bossman’s office, closes the door, and takes a seat at his huge, glass desk. Bossman starts laying it in, point out all of his errors, belittling his work and saying he doesn’t have a brain and yelling at him about how it should be done.

The entire time, John starts to feel humiliated, insecure, frustrated at himself, angry at Bossman for yelling at him, and stressed out about the whole situation. I mean, who wants to be yelled at?

While he’s being yelled at, he just takes it all in silence. Why argue with a guy like this? It won’t make a difference whatever he tries to say. Guys like his boss will always think they’re right no matter what they say. The smart thing to do, he thought, was just to take it.

At the end of the roast, while his ego is at an all time low, his boss asks, “do you have anything to say?”

What should he do? Be defensive? Say how he feels disrespected by the way he was treated? Mention how he could have been nicer in his reproach? Blame someone else?

“Thank you. You’re right and I’ll take what you said, apply it, and improve so those mistakes won’t happen again” John says.

An attitude of gratitude, he thought.

He told me that he had learned when all else fails, putting on an attitude of gratitude is key.

Think about it, it changes your mindset so that you can reframe it from a negative experience to a positive, learning experience. In turn, you will react and respond to the event in a totally different way.

Instead of interpreting his boss reprimanding him as a sign of failure, he saw it as an opportunity to learn from his boss’s feedback, improve, and become better. And he was grateful for his boss calling him out because a boss who didn’t care wouldn’t even take the time to teach him a lesson.

From that point forward, John raised his standards for himself and consistently produced high-quality work. Half out of fear of being yelled at by Bossman, but half because of the satisfaction he gets from knowing he’s constantly growing and becoming better at his craft.

“At my workplace,” John says, “the high volume and steep learning curve will weed out the ones who can’t hang. But the ones who stay tend to produce at such a higher level than they ever thought they were capable of.”

But this wouldn’t be possible, I presume, if people aren’t able to have the right attitude.