What Motivates Us

Yesterday, my boss told us a story in our Monday morning meeting that shifted the way I thought about motivation. I’m paraphrasing for sure but hopefully the meat of the story stays in tact.

There were these two men who ran together everyday, one was older and one was significantly younger. Based on appearance, the younger man’s youth and vitality would assumably give him an advantage. However, the younger man could never catch up to and pass the old man.

One day, the older man asks the younger one, “Whatย do you think about when you run? What motivates you to keep going?”

The young man responds, “I imagine a snarling, hungry wolf running behind me, his teeth chomping at my heels. That’s what keeps me going.”

“Interesting,” said the old man.

“What about you? What do you think about when you run?” said the young man.

The old man replied, “I imagine I’m the one chasing the wolf. Though I can never catch him, I always try.”

It’s easy to see how this key distinction affects each man’s drive. One focuses on the fear of being eaten by the wolf, while the other focuses on surpassing the thing that’s better than him.

Many times, we focus on what we don’t want. As Tony Robbins says, “what you focus on expands.” Likewise, we fail to instead focus on what we do want and head toward that.

Its funny how when you ask someone if they could design the ideal life for themselves 10 years into the future, they usually can tell you more about what they don’t want compared to what they do want.

Then, we wonder why we get all the things we don’t want, and never what we do want.

So my challenge to you, the reader, is how can you stop focusing on the bad, and instead focus on what we want more of? Better yet, how can we push ourselves to chase our higher self everyday? While we shouldn’t ever think we’ll achieve “perfection,” you might surprise yourself on how much you’ll grow in pursuit of it.

For me, I’m stuck on a treadmill chasing treadmill ahead of me. Who knows if I can ever catch it ๐Ÿƒ๐Ÿผ๐Ÿค”

image
Where’s that darn wolf? ๐Ÿ•๐Ÿฉ๐Ÿ–๐Ÿฆ„

 

Advertisements

99% is hard, 100% is easy

image
This book is packed with nuggets of wisdom.

I heard this as I was listening to Success Principlesย by Jack Canfield last week. The contextย is when you want to develop a new habit in your routine, but can’t seem to stick to your commitment.

A perfect example many of us can relate to is working out.

Continue reading “99% is hard, 100% is easy”

Small problems, small person

The size of the problem determines the size of the person.

So this morning as I was headed to the gym for my 5:30am workout, I somehow managed to lose my earbuds during the walk from my car to the gym (as I was taking a selfie for my workout accountability group). I spent the next 5-10 minutes retracing my steps, getting frustrated at the fact that I may have just lost my $20 apple ear buds.

gym selfie
Somewhere between the walk from my car to this selfie is when I lost them =(

A couple weeks prior, I had to replace my $10 gym lock that I absentmindedly left in the men’s locker room. Needless to say, I was ticked that I can’t seem to stop wasting money on things I lose.

After giving up the search, I realized that I was getting worked up over something so small. Yes, $20 can buy a lot of things like a all-you-can-eat Korean BBQย or 2 admission tickets to a new release movie in theaters. And I’m not a rich person, but I’m also not so financially insecure where replacing lost earphones would mean I couldn’t eat for the next few days.

My point: why was I letting something so trivial get me down?

In the book “Secrets of the Millionaire Mind,” T. Harv Eker makes a comparison about the mentalities “rich” people versus “poor” people. He says that poor people are smaller than their problems, whereas rich people are bigger than their problems.

This is how I interpret it: if I let something small get me down, then I’m a small person. Small problems don’t affect big people, only big problems.

As one partย of my daily habits, I recite what’s called a “commercial affirmation” toย myself. Its pretty self-explanatory, but it’s basically a paragraph of affirmations written in the third person about the person I want to become in the future. Or as a mentor of mine says, my “higher self.” I do this once a day, usually in the mornings before my commute to work.

When something small like losing my earphones gets me worked up, I think: would my higher self, the multi-millionaire entrepreneur, international speaker, and bestselling author be phased by this?

The answer is always a resounding “Nope.”

If the size of the problems determines the size of the person, how “big” of a person are you? What’s getting you down that you know isn’t worth your time, energy, or attention?

I’ve always been taught that mindset is where it all begins. When you can control how you think, you can control your reality.

Event + Response = Outcome.

But that’s a whole topic in itself, haha. As of now, I have a new lock, 2 sets of earphones (a backup in case I lose mine again), and I haven’t even given it a second thought.

ear buds
Daiso earbuds = $1.50. Problem solved. B)

Procrastination

Exactly what I’ve been doing since I finally got myself to open this account. I ask myself, “why does starting something seem like the hardest part?” I know that once I get the ball rolling, momentum will eventually take over and it’ll be harder to stop than start

#powerofhabit

Similar to how i’m consistently going to the gym everyday, or at least 6 days a week. Forcing myself to run or do some form of cardio for a mile, as well as a muscle group to focus on before the cardio. Right now I’m almost 35 days straight consistent of exercising and working out, minus the 3 days I was traveling to and from Phoenix, AZ. But now, its easier to keep going and keep up the momentum. Its still a challenge at times to force myself to get up at 5am, but I only need to utilize just enough #willpower to create a habit, then I won’t need to exert those willpower muscles, or rather focus on developing the next habit.

So now i’m trying to apply this concept with writing in this blog consistently. My original goal was maybe once per week. Then I read a blog about 1st time bloggers, and some key points. The lady talked about 2-3 times minimum per week to gain traction. For me, I’m probably going to shoot for 1 post / day, or at least 6 days a week. This way I force myself to 1) make it a habit and 2) force myself to become consistent and comfortable with writing. I figure 350+ posts at the end of the year and my writing should be at least a bit decent ๐Ÿ˜‰

Writing constantly will also allow me to develop the familiarity with blogging, learn as I go, generate a large quantity of contentย that I can reorganize, re-synthesize, and refine in my future posts/blogs, and establish my style as a writer.

But for now, baby steps. The hardest part is starting. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step, right?

Well, let’s begin!